Fedora Linux 35 Beta Install NVIDIA Driver

This is a quick one because the installation works in the same way as it did in Fedora 34.

First, I added the RPM Fusion repositories as described here.

sudo dnf install \
  https://download1.rpmfusion.org/free/fedora/rpmfusion-free-release-$(rpm -E %fedora).noarch.rpm
sudo dnf install \
  https://download1.rpmfusion.org/nonfree/fedora/rpmfusion-nonfree-release-$(rpm -E %fedora).noarch.rpm

Next, I installed the akmod-nvidia package like it is explained on this page.

sudo dnf update
sudo dnf install akmod-nvidia

One reboot later, the NVIDIA module was up and running.

$ lsmod | grep nvidia
nvidia_drm             69632  4
nvidia_modeset       1200128  8 nvidia_drm
nvidia              35332096  408 nvidia_modeset
drm_kms_helper        303104  1 nvidia_drm
drm                   630784  8 drm_kms_helper,nvidia,nvidia_drm

For completeness: my computer has an NVIDIA GT1030.

I hope this helped you, and thank you for reading.

KDE Plasma Remap Meta/Windows Key From App Launcher to KRunner

Sometimes I want to run applications that I do not have pinned to the quick-launch bar of my choice’s operating system/desktop environment. To do that, I am used to pressing the Windows/Meta Key, begin typing a few characters, and hit Enter. This is muscle memory and hard to get rid of. Although it does not matter which UI opens, I do not need the full-blown KDE Application Launcher, Gnome Shell, or Windows Start Menu. The amount of UI that pops up and changes while searching for the app is distracting.

Therefore, I wondered whether I could remap the Meta/Windows key from opening the Application Launcher to opening KRunner. And you can, but only on the command line.

Remove the key mapping from the Application Launcher.

kwriteconfig5 --file kwinrc --group ModifierOnlyShortcuts --key Meta ""

Open KRunner instead.

kwriteconfig5 --file kwinrc --group ModifierOnlyShortcuts --key Meta "org.kde.krunner,/App,,toggleDisplay"

Apply the changes to the current session.

qdbus org.kde.KWin /KWin reconfigure

I hope this helps you. Thank you for reading.

Qt6 QtCreator Crash After Install on Ubuntu 21.04

Hopping Linux distributions, I came to Ubuntu 21.04, and one of the first things I do is install Qt manually. I have described the process in a previous blog post on Linux Mint, and it is the same for Ubuntu. Except for a tiny detail. On Ubuntu, the bundled QtCreator immediately crashes and triggers a "Send Diagnostic" dialog.

$ /opt/Qt/Tools/QtCreator/bin/qtcreator
qt.qpa.plugin: Could not load the Qt platform plugin "xcb" in "" even though it was 
found. This application failed to start because no Qt platform plugin could be 
initialized. Reinstalling the application may fix this problem.

Available platform plugins are: eglfs, linuxfb, minimal, minimalegl, offscreen, vnc, 
xcb.

The fix is simple.

sudo apt install libxcb-xinerama0

I hope this helps. Thank you for reading.

Customize Nautilus Default Bookmarks

Nautilus is the default file manager in basically all Gnome-based distributions. I wonder why I cannot configure the default Bookmarks in the left panel through a context menu with that wide adoption. Is there no demand?

I managed to achieve my goal by editing two files. One is for the user, and the other one is a system file. I have not tried multiple user accounts, but I assume it affects everyone that uses the computer.

I wanted to remove "Desktop", "Public", "Templates", and "Video" because I never need that. What I ended up doing was to also change the location of "Documents", "Music", and "Pictures" to point to their respective OneDrive equivalents. That saves me from creating symbolic links, as I have explained in one of my OneDrive posts.

First, the user file.

vim ~/.config/user-dirs.dirs

#XDG_DESKTOP_DIR="$HOME/Desktop"
XDG_DOWNLOAD_DIR="$HOME/Downloads"
#XDG_TEMPLATES_DIR="$HOME/Templates"
#XDG_PUBLICSHARE_DIR="$HOME/Public"
XDG_DOCUMENTS_DIR="$HOME/OneDrive/Files"
XDG_MUSIC_DIR="$HOME/OneDrive/Music"
XDG_PICTURES_DIR="$HOME/OneDrive/Pictures"
#XDG_VIDEOS_DIR="$HOME/Videos"

Next, the system file. If you only remove entries from the user file, they will be added again the next time you log in. My tests showed that it is enough to customize the location in the user file. The other way around does not work, however.

sudo vim /etc/xdg/user-dirs.defaults

#DESKTOP=Desktop
DOWNLOAD=Downloads
#TEMPLATES=Templates
#PUBLICSHARE=Public
DOCUMENTS=Files
MUSIC=Music
PICTURES=Pictures
#VIDEOS=Videos
# Another alternative is:
#MUSIC=Documents/Music
#PICTURES=Documents/Pictures
#VIDEOS=Documents/Videos

Finally, you need to log out and log in again for this change to take effect.

I hope this helps. Thank you for reading.

OneDrive Sync On Linux Part 3, With abraunegg/onedrive As Daemon

In a previous blog post, I showed another way of syncing OneDrive folders on Linux as an alternative to using RCLONE. It was the Open-Source project “onedrive” by Github user “abraunegg” (a fork of an abandoned project by user “skilion”). One thing I was having trouble with was the installation as a daemon. I used an @reboot crontab workaround to achieve my goal instead. However, I was not satisfied, so I went back to the documentation to see if I missed something. And miss I did. To my defense, other steps I had tried are omitting a necessary detail required to make it work.

I have mentioned the installation in the other post, but I also left out a thing or two that I came across. That is why I will include the setup process again, this time in more detail, and refer you to the other blog post for configuration tips. That is the part I will skip here.

My test system is the same Fedora 34 distribution, and I have also tested the steps on Pop!_OS, which means it should work on the other Ubuntu derivates.

Read More »

OneDrive Sync On Linux Part 2, With abraunegg/onedrive

Edit: There is a part 3 that solves the daemon problem.

It has been about a year since my first blog post about syncing Microsoft’s OneDrive cloud storage on Linux. The last time around, I used RCLONE, which required a more hands-on approach. I have found a new tool that I think is better because it can sync automatically in the background without scripting or manually hacking. It is aptly called onedrive that you can find on Github.

Its name might suggest that Microsoft finally ported their Windows and Mac clients to Linux, but, unfortunately, that is not the case. I would still like to see this happen, and if there is ever a time for Microsoft to do it, it is probably now.

Let me briefly explain how I have installed and configured the onedrive tool to suit my needs. Thanks to good default values, it is straightforward, and you might not need any configuration at all.

(I wonder how I managed to not find this tool a year ago)

Read More »

OpenRGB – An RGB Software I Want to Use (It Runs on Linux!)

If you are in the market for anything gaming PC or gaming laptop related, chances are, you have come across the industry-wide trend of RGB illuminated hardware and peripherals. Everything is RGB, from the graphics card to the RAM, to your headset (because you can see the lights when you wear it 🙄), and many, many more. I am not against RGB lighting per se, but if you follow the industry as a PC hardware enthusiast, it is evident that in some aspects, this has gone too far.

Quick side note: after a rant about RGB software, I will show examples of using OpenRGB on Windows and Linux. If you are interested in only that, skip the rant and scroll to the bottom.

Read More »

Qt5 QtCreator Error on Linux: stddef.h: No such file or directory – Code model could not parse an included file

The following is an error that has shown itself every time I have installed the Qt5 framework and the QtCreator development environment on a Linux based machine. It never mattered which flavor of Linux; QtCreator always showed this error.

Warning: The code model could not parse an included file, which might lead to incorrect code completion and highlighting, for example. 

fatal error: 'stddef.h' file not found 
note: in file included from /home/rlo/Code/C++/WorkTracker2/WorkTracker2Shared/src/data/taskrepository.h:1: 
note: in file included from /home/rlo/Code/C++/WorkTracker2/WorkTracker2Shared/src/data/taskrepository.h:3: 
note: in file included from /usr/include/c++/9/optional:38: 
note: in file included from /usr/include/c++/9/stdexcept:38: 
note: in file included from /usr/include/c++/9/exception:143: 
note: in file included from /usr/include/c++/9/bits/exception_ptr.h:38: 

Although that message never caused any issues compiling the code, I found it rather annoying, and at some point, annoying enough to search for a solution.

As it turns out, this message appears when you have Clang libraries installed. QtCreator detects that and automatically uses Clang to parse the source code and provide inline error messages and code completion.

You can get rid of this error when you explicitly add the STL header files’ include-path to your project. In my case, I have added the following to my *.pro file.

unix {
    INCLUDEPATH += /usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-linux-gnu/9/include
}

Linux Gaming: Middle Earth – Shadow of Mordor; Get it to run, and run it fast

Gaming on Linux is a challenge because only a few companies take the time to create native Linux ports of their games. It is even more challenging when those natively ported games do not run at all or do not run well. One of them is Middle Earth: Shadow of Mordor. I have bought this game specifically because it has a native Linux version – and because I remember that it was well received by media and players.

This game has two issues:

  • It refuses to start in full-screen mode.
  • The performance is terrible.

Let’s go through these two issues and see how they manifest and how to fix them.

Read More »

Pop!_OS Linux Fixing Windows Dual Boot Problem

In a previous blog post I have mentioned that I was not able to add my Windows 10 installation to the Grub boot menu. I have finally found a solution. Now, in my last Linux blog post I mentioned that I ultimately gave up on Linux after trying Ubuntu 20.04. Well, I could not stop thinking about it. I am on Pop!_OS again and although I did not disconnect any SSD on installation, Pop! did not detect Windows 10 and add it to Grub itself. So, I was back at where I started.

Quick recap of the setup: I have two SATA SSDs (yes, SATA, like a cave man), one with Windows 10 (the Crucial MX500) and one with Pop!_OS Linux (the Samsung 850 Evo). The bootloader for each OS is on the respective SSD.

Now, enough background, let us get to the solution!

If you are CLI wizard do your thing, I will be using a convenient UI for the first step. Open “Disks” and locate the Windows 10 EFI partition. It’s around 100MB in size. Once you have found it, click the “Play” button to mount it.

The Disks utility will then display the mount point that is required in the next step.

Now, copy some Windows 10 Boot files to your Linux /boot folder. Yes, you read that right. Sounds weird, but it did the trick.

Do this with Nautilus or use the following command (which I recommend). Replace <mount point> with the path you got from the Disks utility. Note that path completion does not work once you go past /boot/efi. The EFI folder exists, you merely do not have permissions to see it as a regular user.

sudo cp -r /<mount point>/EFI/Microsoft /boot/efi/EFI

The last step consists of making the boot menu show up so you can actually select an entry. Edit loader.conf and add “timeout 10” (or any amount of seconds you prefer).

sudo vim /boot/efi/loader/loader.conf

All you need to do now is reboot and (hopefully) enjoy a boot menu with your Pop!_OS and Windows 10 boot entries. I do not know if this procedure also works with other Linux variants. It might for the Ubuntu based distributions, but I cannot say.

OneDrive Sync On Linux With RCLONE

Update, 2, July 2021 I have found another tool that I now prefer. Read this blog post to learn more, or read this blog for yet even more information 😉.

In my quest to move to Linux as a daily driver it was important for me that I could continue to use Microsoft’s OneDrive cloud storage. Unsurprisingly, Windows 10 comes bundled with a OneDrive sync client. There is no official Linux support though, so I had to resort to a 3rd party tool. Luckily, there is a very powerful utility called rclone that does almost exactly what I want and I’ll explain how I have it set up to suit my needs.

Spoiler: it’s not as convenient as Microsoft’s sync client, but it has other things going for it.

Read More »

The Linux Experiment: One Month Later

It has been roughly a month since I switched from using Windows 10 as my main operating system to Linux. The reasons for that have all been detailed in The Switching Windows to Linux Experiment blog post. Now I will share a few of the experiences I have made during the first month (it’s been that long already) and what I think about how well it is going.

Let me address the elefant in the room first, the distribution. I think that is likely the first question you, the reader, would ask. The short answer is Pop!_OS by System76.

Read More »

Debian Testing “Bullseye”: The Repository Does Not Have a Release File

After installing Debian Testing "Bullseye" mid March 2020 I got an error trying to run apt update.

E: The repository 'http://security.debian.org./debian-security 
bullseye/updates Release' does not have a Release file.

Unfortunately, the Debian maintainers managed to let a bug creep into the /etc/apt/sources.list. It’s called "Testing" for a reason, I guess.

The offending lines are this.

deb http://security.debian.org/debian-security/ bullseye/updates main
deb-src http://security.debian.org/debian-security/ bullseye/updates main

Note "bullseye/updates", which is where the error is. Change those two lines to look like this.

deb http://security.debian.org/debian-security/ bullseye-security main
deb-src http://security.debian.org/debian-security/ bullseye-security main

After that, the update will work. I have noticed that in a later version of the installer this bug has been fixed.