The Worst “Accept Cookie Policy” Implementation

All the cookie policy notifications on every website are a nuisance in and of itself. There is one special kind however, that not only bugs you to accept it, but also throws a giant blocking “dialog” in your face that prevents you from using the site while it’s doing… well… I have no friggin’ clue what it’s doing. What I know is that it takes forever to get out of my way.

There’s not much content here other than this short rant about this terrible TrustArc / TRUSTe cookie accepting widget thingy that takes about a minute to do its thing. Why do websites add this to their page? Don’t they test it first? Does that save so much time in development that annoying the users is worth it? How much does that tell you about a website’s owner? I hate these things!

Integration Testing With Docker Maven Plugin, PostgreSQL, Flyway

Some things in software development require more than mocks and unit testing. If your application uses a database it makes sense to also hit that database in automated testing to ensure custom SQL queries work correctly, Hibernate relations are set up properly and also that database migrations are successful.

This blog post was written with a focus on the latter. I will be using Spring Boot talking to a PostgreSQL database. The database structure is managed via Flyway and, basically customary for Java applications, Maven serves as the build and dependency management tool. Docker will also play a role because we’ll be creating and running a PostgreSQL docker image for testing. From Maven. Every time the test is executed. And to spice things up, we’ll also create a custom database and user in that dockerized PSQL image.

I have created a working sample on Github and you can follow every single step by taking a look at the commit history. There you can see individual changes, starting from an empty Spring Boot application with no database to the final solution with Spring Data JPA and Flyway.

In the following sections and snippets, I will highlight the important parts of each step.

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OneDrive Sync On Linux With RCLONE

In my quest to move to Linux as a daily driver it was important for me that I could continue to use Microsoft’s OneDrive cloud storage. Unsurprisingly, Windows 10 comes bundled with a OneDrive sync client. There is no official Linux support though, so I had to resort to a 3rd party tool. Luckily, there is a very powerful utility called rclone that does almost exactly what I want and I’ll explain how I have it set up to suit my needs.

Spoiler: it’s not as convenient as Microsoft’s sync client, but it has other things going for it.

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The Linux Experiment: One Month Later

It has been roughly a month since I switched from using Windows 10 as my main operating system to Linux. The reasons for that have all been detailed in The Switching Windows to Linux Experiment blog post. Now I will share a few of the experiences I have made during the first month (it’s been that long already) and what I think about how well it is going.

Let me address the elefant in the room first, the distribution. I think that is likely the first question you, the reader, would ask. The short answer is Pop!_OS by System76.

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Comparing Java Optional vs C++ STL optional

Optionals in Java have been around for some time now, basically since the release of version 8. My other language of choice, C++, has received this feature in version C++17. Since I am currently in the process of writing some C++ code, I was curious how they were implemented there. Optionals are trying to solve a problem that is likely to plague any language. What shall a method or function return if there is no value? Or shall it not return anything but instead start crying like a petulant child and throw an exception?

As an introduction, let me dive a little bit into why we need optionals (or do we?) and compare two different implementations of this concept, one being java.util.Optional and the other C++ std::optional. I chose to compare these two language for several reasons:

  1. I work with Java in my day job, so I have a good idea of how it works there.
  2. As mentioned, C++ is one of the languages I know quite well too.
  3. The main reason: both optional implementations are add-on classes rather than language features. More on that later.
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