CMake on Windows 10 with Qt5 Error: CMAKE_PREFIX_PATH

Quick one: Set the proper CMAKE_PREFIX_PATH value for Qt5 development on Windows 10 with MinGW and CMake.

Here is the lovely error you get from CMake.

CMake Error at CMakeLists.txt:13 (find_package):
 By not providing "FindQt5.cmake" in CMAKE_MODULE_PATH this project 
has
 asked CMake to find a package configuration file provided by "Qt5", 
but
 CMake did not find one.

 Could not find a package configuration file provided by "Qt5" with 
any of
 the following names:

 Qt5Config.cmake
 qt5-config.cmake

 Add the installation prefix of "Qt5" to CMAKE_PREFIX_PATH or set 
"Qt5_DIR"
 to a directory containing one of the above files. If "Qt5" provides a
 separate development package or SDK, be sure it has been installed.

CMake asks you to tell it where to find the Qt5 *.cmake configuration files. One option is to set the CMAKE_PREFIX_PATH variable. The Qt5 documentation has the following to say about that:

The easiest way to use CMake is to set the CMAKE_PREFIX_PATH environment variable to the install prefix of Qt 5.

Now, what the hell is the "install prefix"? It turns out it is the path where you can find the compiler-specific Qt binaries, include files and the other stuff. In my case, using MinGW, it is located at "C:\Apps\Qt\5.14.2\mingw73_64". If you are using the MSVC binaries, select the corresponding directory, probably something like "C:\Apps\Qt\5.14.2\msvc_2017".

The Linux Experiment: Conclusion

A few months back now I have written about how I was trying to use Linux as my main operating system. I will not reiterate my motives here. If you are interested feel free to read the initial story back from March. In my one-month-later story I was already having some doubts, but continued to stick with it.

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Windows Fluent Design – Rendering Bugs?

As an avid listener of Windows Weekly I often hear discussions between Paul Thurrott, Mary Joe Foley and Leo Laporte about Microsoft’s Fluent Design. Microsoft continues to evolve the visual language of Windows and thus it’s a regular topic on one of my favorite podcasts. I’ve been noticing it here and there myself, mainly in system dialogs, but I’ve never really paid any attention because none of the applications I use on a regular basis make use of it – and currently I’m rather happy about that fact. Just recently though, I was struck by one effect in particular and that was the spark that got this blog post going. To be honest, in most cases where I notice these Fluent Design elements I think of them as rendering bugs. Like sometimes in games, when the graphics driver is not yet optimized, or a badly programmed game engine draws odd pictures sometimes, flaws in an otherwise normal picture. I have a few examples to show to you.

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Windows 10: First Impressions (Preview Build 10041)

While I was grooming my unicorn on Crazy-Talk Island I read on the Internet about a thing called Windows 10. Curious as I am, I went out to watch the huge presentation on Jan, 21 where Microsoft officially unveiled the mobile version of Windows 10 and the cool hardware stuff. There’s also a very nice set of videos by Scott Hanselman on YouTube that show the changes from version to version.

Actually I’m very much aware of Windows 10 since the beginning, as a developer I’d be crazy not to, so I registered as a Windows Insider yesterday and downloaded the technical preview build 10041. Here’s a summary of my first impressions.
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